While the Confederate “heritage” flag still flies, Princeton Battlefield is about to be desecrated

by InsightAnalytical

July 31, 2015….Unfortunately, the building has started…

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I’ve been following this story from afar and it’s down to the wire now. Although the Princeton Battlefield Society has an injunction for now, the bulldozers are there and the construction fencing is up.

http://www.centraljersey.com/news/princeton-institute-for-advanced-study-battlefield-society-reach-agreement-to/article_483301b4-1528-11e5-8692-77a36e017dd3.html

What a perfect place to build 15 townhouses for The Advanced Institute’s faculty housing….

Why should this place be treasured?

On January 3, 1777, the peaceful winter fields and woods of Princeton Battlefield were transformed into the site of what is considered to be the fiercest fight of its size during the American Revolution. During this desperate battle, American troops under General George Washington surprised and defeated a force of British Regulars. Coming at the end of “The Ten Crucial Days” which saw the well-known night crossing of the Delaware River and two battles in Trenton, the Battle of Princeton gave Washington his first victory against the British Regulars on the field. The battle extended over a mile away to the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University).

The famous Mercer Oak, once stood in the middle of the battlefield, not far from the spot where General Hugh Mercer fell during the Battle of Princeton.

http://www.visitprinceton.org/activities/history/princetonbattlefield/

Here is a great new video that shows how the battle was fought and views of the park and area today…and the fight that goes on to save the battlefield…including an interview with a descendant of one of the soldiers who fought in the battle

The Crossroads of the Revolution video is on this page:

http://www.theprincetonbattlefieldsociety.com/

When living in the area, I often drove out of Princeton down the narrow road, past the Monument (where I once saw wedding photos being taken), past the Clarke House (built in 1772, the only building still standing near the battlefield), through the deep woods over the little stream, past the open fields and finally out to Route 1. I remember the now-gone Mercer Oak. I also once took a birding hike along trails on the Institute’s land. The road through the grounds was like going back to 1777, a miracle on the way to the modern ugliness and congestion of Route 1.

So, the bulldozers are out on the battlefield now….to take more property from this area and turn it over to development.

Princeton Battlefield Monument

Heritage worth protecting….this is a state park and listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places, as a U.S. National Historic Landmark. a U.S. Historic district, and is on the New Jersey Register of Historic Places.

The narrator at the end of the video has it right….this is hallowed ground…”in a country that espouses patriotism while trivializing preservation….we owe it to the generations to follow, to preserve what little is left…..”

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